Code {Essay}

High Fantasy, High Drama, High Art

In Code Geass, the stakes could not be higher. From the very beginning of its narrative taking place in dystopian alternate history — where a monarchical Euro-American coalition known as Britannia rules much of the globe with an iron fist — the fate of that world is in play. Lelouch Lamperouge, brilliant high school student / exiled prince with dormant ambitions and a fearlessness borne not from courage but from purposeless, is gifted a power. The power of geass comes from an immortal witch with green hair, and it gives Lelouch the capability of commanding people, just once, to do his absolute bidding, no matter what it may be. This so-called ‘power of the king,’ to bend the will of humanity to his whim, becomes the power to change the world. Lelouch vi Britannia embarks upon the path of this change, borne of deception and blood and chaos.

Revolution vs. Reform

The core conflict of Geass is in the companionship and rivalry between Lelouch and Suzaku. Their philosophies and the violent contests between them make up the most intriguing aspect of the plot; they are the best characters within this narrative, and consequently, are the most pivotal.

The Zero Requiem

Code Geass maybe has the best ending of any anime or show I have yet seen. It takes place in the form of that aptly, dramatically titled “Zero Requiem.” The maneuver provides a satisfying conclusion to the whole saga, for all characters involved. Each in their own way, it is the ultimate redemption for both Suzaku and Lelouch. Just as they speak into existence throughout the series — there is nothing they cannot do together — they arrive at this conclusion together, as equals. And so, in the endgame, after Lelouch and Suzaku have teamed up and finally defeated all of the foes standing in their way and effectively ’taken over the world,’ they create it anew with The Zero Requiem (“ZR”).

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